A Little Honey Bee by Gracie Emerick

A Little Honey Bee by Gracie Emerick
I'm a little honey bee I hope to not die from CCD Me and my un-bee-lievable friends Think our challenges have no ends, 30 to 90 percent of us are gone Because of all that is going on.   I'm a little honey bee I might die from CCD, Most of us have disappeared Because of what we have feared, Pesticides, mite, viruses too, Fungi, bacteria it's like the flu.   I'm a little honey bee I will not die from CCD...

June Honey Bee Power Plant

June Honey Bee Power Plant
Catmint – Nepeta species Catmint is a long-blooming perennial that is easily grown in average to dry, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. They form a spreading clump of stems rising to 36” tall, depending on the species, and spreading up to 36” wide. The tubular blue flowers appear on spikes. Sheer off spent flower spikes to promote continued bloom. Other attributes include: Long bloom time late May – September. No serious insect pes

June Letter from the South

June Letter from the South
We all tell tales about big swarms, the kind that barely fit into your catch box. Well, this morning I was called out to the smallest swarm I have ever seen, and I’ve attached a photo. Catching the swarm was simple enough; I simply pulled up the stake and shook it over my catch box. As to what to do with the swarm, I’m not sure yet. In “Honey bee Biology and Beekeeping”, Dewey Caron gives the smallest size swarm that can successfully develop into a colony ...

May Letter from the South

May Letter from the South
You will recall that at the end of March, I was turning down swarm calls because I had no equipment to spare. What I didn’t know at the time was that a cold and windy spell that hit right after the March swarm burst meant that parent colonies were unable to requeen themselves, so when I checked in on the colonies a few weeks later, some colonies were hopelessly queenless. I combined these queenless colonies with queenright ones, in the process freeing up s...

MCBA: Volunteers Make It Happen

MCBA: Volunteers Make It Happen
The Montgomery County Beekeepers Association is entirely run by volunteers. Over the years, we have had many so people who have been instrumental in creating and growing MCBA, and furthering our mission. When you talk to the older members of our club, George Imrie’s name always comes up. George was, along with a few others, our founding father. If you Google “George Imrie Pink Pages,” you will find a wealth of information. You will notice very quickly t...

March MCBA Meeting Recap: Tim McMahon, How Do Honey Bees Differ from Other Bees?

March MCBA Meeting Recap: Tim McMahon, How Do Honey Bees Differ from Other Bees?
  As MCBA members, while we have a primary interest in the honeybee, the environment in which apis mellifera lives and makes honey for us is the same one in which thousands of other species of native bees pollinate and perpetuate a diverse variety of plants. A few bee facts: There are 20,000 bee species There are 4,000 bee species in the U.S. There are 430 bee species in Maryland 90% of all bee species are solitary 10% are c...

April MCBA Meeting Recap:  Cybil Preston, Chief Apiary Inspector

April MCBA Meeting Recap:  Cybil Preston, Chief Apiary Inspector
Cybil presented an overview of work done by her department and reminded members that registering our hives with the Department of Agriculture is mandatory – and important, since only registered hive owners will be notified about mosquito spraying by email and text this year. The bulk of her presentation concerned Mack, her canine inspector sidekick, who specializes in detecting American Foul Brood — AFB — a highly contagious bacterial disease that infec...

May Honey Bee Power Plant

May Honey Bee Power Plant
Giant Onion – Allium giganteum ‘Globemaster’ This month, we feature the bulbous perennial commonly called Giant Onion. This may very well be the tallest of the ornamental onions, and one of my favorites. From the center of each basal rosette of gray-green leaves, comes a thick 3’ – 4’ stalk that is topped with a dense, globular, softball-sized cluster of tiny star-shaped purple florets. Leaves and stems smell like onions when they’re bruised, but the

Upcoming Calendar Items

Upcoming Calendar Items
Events   JUNE 3, 2017   SUMMER BARBECUE will be at Brookside Nature Center on Sat. June 3 from 11AM to 4PM. JUNE 14, 2017  MCBA MONTHLY MEETING, 7pm - 9pm at Brookside Nature Center July 31 - August 4 ANNUAL EAS MEETING in Newark, Delaware.   Excellent lectures, from the very practical beekeeping to the more scientific bee talks. Short courses for beginners, an intermediates and more advanced beekeepers.  CLICK for LOTS more info. CLICK

In Defense of Stained Hands by BeeGeorge

In Defense of Stained Hands by BeeGeorge
Part of the appeal of keeping bees is to help get us out of our offices and away from florescent lights.  As beekeepers, we start to notice rhythms other than the 9 to 5 commuters’ morning rush hour rhythms.  We start to hear the music of our natural environment.  Even in our large cities, nature speaks to us. Part of becoming a beekeeper is learning how to listen. We see that different flowers bloom at different times and intervals.  We notice the dand...